Rating: 6.4 Fair
Popularity:10
Difficulty:Easy
Year:1978
Players: 2-7 players
Playing time: 240 minutes
Age:16+

Official Site: Junta game page — Alderac Entertainment Group


Created by: Eric Goldberg, Ben Grossman, Steve Marsh, Steven Marsh, Vincent Tsao, Nikola Vrtis, Larry Catalano, Peter Corless, Stephen Crane, Stefan Dick, James Dunn, Martin Hoffmann, Jon Rettich, Claus Stephan

Published by: Alderac Entertainment Group (AEG), ASS Altenburger Spielkarten, Borras Plana S.A.

Alternate Names: Golpe, フンタ, 槍桿政權

Description:

Players represent various families in Republica de los Bananas.

Each game turn has between 7 and 9 rounds, drawing cards, President assigns roles, foreign aid money is drawn, the president proposes a budget which is voted on, locations are chosen, there are assassination attempts, then the bank may be open or not, there may be a coup and aftermath, then the next round starts.

The game is for 4 to 7 players (although there are 2 and 3 player variants). A president for life (El Presidente) is elected and then she or he allocates roles for all other players.

Depending upon his or her office and the various cards they hold, each player has a certain number of votes. These are important for the first vote to elect El Presidente and then there are votes each turn on the budget proposed by the President.

The budget starts when the President draws 8 money cards face down from the money deck (which varies in denomination from $1 to $3) and proposes allocations. Not everyone will be included in the budget and the amounts are at the President's discretion. The President can keep undisclosed foreign aid money.

Players may attempt to assassinate the other players including the President by guessing where they will be from among five locations.

Players who successfully assassinate another player take that player's unbanked money, the only safe money is the money that has been deposited in a players' Swiss bank account, and the only way to get to the bank is to survive the assassination round.

If players are unhappy, see an advantage, or just want to, and there is a 'coup excuse', they can start a coup. A coup sees players compete using armed forces to control a majority of the 5 power centers.

Rebel players control the forces of the role which they were assigned prior to the coup (e.g. army, navy, air force), and players loyal to the President do the same, seeking to control the strongholds until the coup is over.

At the conclusion of each coup players who have control of the 5 power centres vote to be pro-President or pro-Junta determining if the President stays, or the Junta wins and elects a new President. And someone is sent to the firing squad.

Players assassinated or killed simply become another member of their family and begin again with new cards, but keeping any of their family's funds deposited in their Swiss bank account.

The game is won by whoever has the most pesos in their Swiss bank account when the money runs out.

Prices:
Retail Price:$49
Amazon:$49
Ebay:$50
Expansions:
Junta Expansion Cards


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Components

  • 1 game board
  • 114 cards
  • 97 markers
  • 96 play money bills
  • 6 dice
  • Rulebook

Introduction

Welcome to the beautiful island nation of La Republica de las Bananas, or as we'll call it, Banana Republic, where the peaceful nighttime chirping of crickets is only interrupted by periodic exchanges of gunfire.

The island's farmers are poor, its intellectuals oppressed, and there's barely a middle class. The damp, humid air is filled with mosquitos, and it stinks of revolution and coups d'etat.

The government is subsidized by one of the global superpowers, which doesn't ask any questions. …



The Board

The map of the island is only required during a Coup d'État. The neighborhoods, army bases, police precincts, embassies, and the five Important Power Centers are clearly demarcated locations.

At the top of the board is a row of squares listing the phases of the political (card) game, indicating which phase is currently in play.

The Deck of Politics Cards

  • Assassins enable an assassination attempt in Phase 6.


  • Bribes enable the control of Units or hinder an assassination. In order to play these cards, one needs cash in hand. …



If there is insufficient consensus reached through democratic processes, Plan B comes into play: Take to the streets and express your dissatisfaction with firepower! Nothing shows El Presidente your unhappiness with his policies like a bombardment of his Palace.

The Coup d'Etat is a sub-game within JUNTA, and here the Unit markers and city map come into play.

After the Coup, the Political Game - specifically Phase 9 - resumes.

Initial Deployments

The military Units always start in the same spaces. The Police either start in I the Police Precincts or all together in I Parliament in the event the Ministro has forced the budget through. …



Two Players

In the two-player version of JUNTA, in addition to the two actual players, three straw men play as well. The rules are the same as the normal JUNTA rules, with the following changes.

Politics Cards

At the beginning of the game, each player receives four Politics cards face-down. Both real players may look at the cards belonging to the straw men and place their Influence cards face up.

The real players may deal with each other as usual. They can only make deals with the straw men when they belong to the same faction, as decided in Phase 4: The Budget. …





Links for Junta


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